The (MDF) Caribou

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My first outfitted big-game hunt was an Alaska barren ground caribou hunt that took place about 20 years ago. Bought the hunt at the Mule Deer Foundation Convention in Sacramento that took place in 1998. The caribou tag says 1998, so that validates the year.

The donation to MDF was set up by Gary Williams, MDF Chairman of the Board. At the time Gary was working for Leupold-Stevens and Leupold paid some of the trip costs as a donation from them.

The hunt went to sale at auction and I was the high bidder for $1700. The hunt took place in September and the caribou we hunted were part of the Mulchatna herd.

Camp was on the Nushagak River and we hunted up and down the river by boat. We found this caribou along the King Salmon River, a Nushagak tributary.

Although the Mulchatna herd was supposedly at an all-time high, I believe it may have already been in decline. We didn’t see many caribou and the one on my wall was probably the largest that my guide, Robert Nelson, or I sighted. Today the Mulchatna herd has still not regained the stature it had during the early 1990’s.

Robert and I stalked to within 60 yards of a small band of caribou and the I shot was the largest bull in the group. We killed him about two miles from the boat and the boat was about 30 miles from camp. The next day we brought a meat packer back with us to make the pack out a little easier.

I had two caribou tags and could have shot another smaller bull, but decided to pass. It was a good decision because I ended up using my second caribou tag on a Sitka blacktail deer on Kodiak Island about a week later.

I killed the bull with a Browning Automatic Rifle in 7mm. It was the first hunting rifle I owned with which I bagged a big game animal. Prior to that time, I hunted big game with bow and arrow only. The rifle was a raffle prize a San Jose MDF banquet in 1995 and it has an inscription on it: CENTRAL COAST CHAPTER, 1995, Fifth Annual Banquet, The Mule Deer Foundation. It was the model and caliber used by John Leonti the original chapter chairman of the San Jose Chapter. He was a nice man who passed away some time during the year before the banquet.

I purchased only one raffle ticket that night because I didn’t want to stay for the end of the banquet. I handed my ticket to David and Rose Stevens before I left and asked them to watch over it. David called me the next day and told me I had won.

I tanned the original cape from my caribou, but never mounted it, probably because I couldn’t afford the price of taxidermy work in those days. Last year I decided to find capes for a few of the animals taken on some of my past hunts. This is the only caribou I’ve killed so it is definitely a trophy to me even though just another caribou to anybody else.

My taxidermist and MDF supporter, Taff Vidalles, searched for a proper cape. Early season capes were available, but they did not properly represent the bull I had killed. Eventually he found a cape with characteristics of the bull I killed and purchased it for $650 wet-tanned.

I ended up paying $1,250 for the mount. $900 was Taff’s normal price. He added $350 (of the $650 cost of the cape) to his regular price and estimated that the $300 credit was appropriate because he normally would have had a preparation and tanning cost of about that much. I agreed.

Here’s me and the bull the way we looked in 1998.

Rich and Caribou

 

Today – Buyer’s Remorse

Yesterday’s win is today’s remorse. I awoke at 3:30 AM with a serious case of buyer’s remorse as I began re-thinking everything bad about purchasing a lot in Modoc County.

The biggest issue is the $195 per year payment to the county on behalf of the Last Frontier Healthcare District (LFHD). I’ve read all about it and there is nothing one can do to escape this annual “Special Tax.”

On the other hand, I’m bound and determined to figure out Modoc County Real Estate and there’s only one way to do it – join in. The LFHD may single-handedly be the demise of the current recreational property fiasco in Modoc County. And, that would be a good thing. I think it’s a clear case of unintended consequences.

While laying in bed, I couldn’t stop wondering if there were a reasonable way out of this financial conundrum. The more I thought about it the more I realized my sleep was over.

Out of bed by 5:00 AM, I felt a knot in my stomach. I hate being stupid, but that’s how I felt – and still feel as I write this. However, this is an educational experience and that includes a full understanding of buyer’s remorse.

At least I didn’t pay more. The value of Modoc real estate is taking it in the shorts, not that it was ever a good deal.

 

Yesterday – Modoc Tax Sale

The Modoc tax collector closed the Modoc tax sale yesterday. Over 200 parcels were offered to the public at auction via a web-based auction on bid4assets.com.

I watched the last couple of hours of the bidding as blocks of offerings closed at a rate of 20 or so parcels every fifteen minutes. I noted that, on the last day of the sale, the tax collector lowered the minimum bid on some of the parcels..

When the minimum bid on two of the lots dropped to $500, I decided to make a bid. Immediately an auto bid offered $600. That was enough for me on that one. The two lots offered for $500 ended up selling for $700 each. Both were in Modoc Recreational Estates.

The minimum bid on a few lots was lowered to $800 each. The highest bid price I noted was $1,500 and another sold for $1,300. Both were in Modoc Recreational Estates.

The minimum bid on about five lots in Pit River Recreational Estates, out of about fifteen,  was dropped to $800 and two of them sold. I couldn’t quite pull the trigger.

Eventually it was down to one lot and I planned to buy one, so I pulled the trigger on item 188 – after the minimum bid was lowered to $800. But, somebody had already bid $800. I figured there might be an auto bid. Sure enough the price jumped to $1,000 after I bid $900. Now I would be forced to bid $1,100 – which I did.

That ended the auction for me. I put my blinders on and went to the bank. When my $535 credit was applied (deposit and admin fee), I owned $601.65 for a total acquisition cost of $1,136.65.

The bank teller asked me if I was certain I wanted to send the money by wire transfer as it would be final and irrevocable. I said yes, and gulped.

For better or worse, Lot 29, block 80 of California Pines Unit 3 will soon be in my name. I laughed when the email from bid4assets.com congratulated me for my “win.”

From where I sat, it appeared that about ten percent of the 200+ lots offered were either sold or withdrawn.

 

 

Tangled Web

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For about two years I’ve been evaluating real estate in Northeastern California. But before I get into that, I need to preface the conversation by saying that I was a real estate agent/broker for 37 years.

During that time I thought I learned a lot about real estate sales. In fact, I did. However, there is an entirely different world of real estate out there. The real estate world in which I operated was legal, ethical and conscientious.

Real estate transactions in Northeastern California are mostly different. The genetic makeup of real estate in Northeastern California, and particularly Modoc County, is infected with corrupt motives. Much of the county is owned by Southern California corporations that operate on a basis not normally seen in California’s real estate industry. And, one of the most prominent owners and sellers of real estate in Modoc County is the county itself.

It appears to me that Modoc County is in the middle of a major conflict of interest.

The properties of which I speak are generally “recreational properties.” Lots range from an acre to a few acres. They were created in mass at a time when land was cheap, laws were lax and oversite was non-existent.

The worst offenders were and still are sub-dividers whose corporations exist only by a continuous chain of “fishing” activities. Lots are mostly void of value because Modoc County has a very limited economic base. The corporations “fish” for inexperienced buyers, who think big brother is watching out for them.

The very worst case scenario is one where the landowner (often Modoc County) offers lots, but not title. This is very common.

The ongoing tax sale in Modoc County is a testimony to the case I am making. Hundreds of lots are for sale and the Modoc County tax collector is offering them at prices three or four times their economic value.

Notice to bidders. If you purchase one of these lots, you may be contributing to the tax sale of 2025.

The lots of which I’m speaking would be more valuable to society if they were all recombined and resold in economically viable units.

What’s going on here? I’m watching.

And, I’m going to purchase a lot. Call it education.

 

 

Always Wanted to Live by a Creek

The only creek I ever lived by was Butt Creek in Plumas County. And, I only lived by it for a month each summer when my brother and I would camp out with my grandparents.

Maybe that’s why I started thinking about adding a creek to my yard. Been thinking about it for years.

Now there is a creek in my back yard. Here’s how it went down.

First I hired my rancher to haul three giant boulders down from our ranch.

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Then I hired a landscape contractor to build the creek. The contractor purchased the pump, creek rocks and liner in a kit. He added Sonoma field stones in the creek and around it. The kit contained a liner to hold the water.

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A submersible pump sits in the hole at the bottom of the photo. The creek is “pondless” so no water stays on the surface for long. The pump moves water at 6000 gallons per hour. (100 gallons per minute). Water is stored inside the underground containers, shown in the photo, when the pump is turned off.

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We tested the pump and liner before adding more rocks.

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At this point, we began to leak water underneath the large bolder farthest to the left. It took about two days to solve the problem, but now it’s looking good.

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My granddaughters like it. Creeks are like a magnet for kids. Can’t wait till the three and four-year-olds arrive. They already have plans to sit under to falls.

Here’s how it looks today. Planting done.

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Sounds like a real creek too.

 

 

 

 

 

How to cook a roast so it is done rare and medium at the same time.

Roasts are great, especially a prime rib roast, but I can never satisfy everybody. Mostly the guys, like their meat rare or medium rare. The ladies, especially my wife, like their meat cooked to at least medium if not well done.

Until yesterday, I could never solve the problem. In an effort to keep half of the roast from over cooking, I cut the roast in half and put the rare portion in foil. The remainder portion, I left on the Traeger grill to cook longer (thinking it would be more well done).

After a about 20 minutes I removed the portion intended to be medium from the grill and opened the foil on the half that was intended to remain rare.

To my surprise, the half that was in foil was medium and the portion on the Traeger was medium rare. Exactly the opposite of what I was trying to do.

So in failing, I succeeded. And, I learned how to solve my problem.

Pretty simple solution, but not intuitive.