M9 Devil’s Garden

Leaving in a day or two. Lots going on. Good thing I had my 2016 hunt check list saved.

Went through it tonight. It is probably more stuff than I’ll take, but I may take it all. Won’t go out shopping much, except for some food.

This is a rut hunt for trophy bucks in great habitat. A bit of a drive from the Bay Area, but not too bad.

Taking my F150 and pulling my 16-foot Cargo trailer with our Rhino ATV and set up for sleeping.

Here is the preliminary list. It will evolve a bit as I pack.

Devil’s Garden muzzleloader M9 Nov1-11, 2018

First Wednesday

Made it back to the Kerry Club for the Wednesday shoot.

As is the norm, the shooting differed quite a bit from Saturday. The morning sky was nice. No wind.

IMG_6329 First Wed. Nice colors

The hunt progressed slowly, but about five birds came by – all singles. I hit four of them. My shooting was better, but their were few targets.

At 10:00 AM, a drake sprig flew by on the edge of range. I knocked him down and tried to do a high-five with Lola. 2 3/4 inch Heavy X shot shells number four shot was deadly.

Only a few limits taken this day, but the guys in the next blind did kill 15 birds including four sprig and a goose.

 

2018 Duck Opener

Arrival at the Kerry Club was unimpressive. As I passed the Ingomar Packing Company ponds, I was surprised that there were zero ducks. When I reached the Kerry Club, I could see a limited number of ducks on the ponds, but not as many as I would normally expect.

Once in camp, I began to look around and I could see some birds working. It was mid-day, too early to arrive at any conclusions about duck numbers.

Other hunters began to arrive about the same time as me. Enthusiasm was high.

Everybody let their labs loose and it was mayhem. My Airstream was in sad shape after a long off-season, but a quick clean-up put it into acceptable shape.

The traditional dinner was excellent with surf and turf with all the trimmings. Parking was at a premium. Camp was about as crowded as I’ve seen it.

Here are some shots from Friday.

 

Being in the “senior” group, I laid myself to rest at 9:00 PM. The younger group was still going strong.

Not a sound could be heard at 5:00 AM when I turned on the Airstream lights, but it wasn’t long before the camp came to life and several more hunters drove up ready for the hunt.

The walk to blind 4 was pleasant. Most of the other hunters rode ATVs so Lola and I were about the last to settle in. My partner, Tom Billingsley, was working so I had the blind to myself. I took my time.

Just after shooting time I snapped this photo of the horizon. As you can see, Lola was ready. She’ll be 12 in January.

IMG_6298 Lola waits at sunrise reset

As is the norm, the ponds were void of ducks by the time everybody was in place, but it wasn’t long before birds poured in, mostly teal and shovelers, but there also quite a few pintail.

My first shot was at a drake pintail. I missed on the first shot, but hit him on the second. He started down, but I lost track of him in the mix. Lola hadn’t seen him.

Bad start. I unhooked Lola and climbed out of the blind, heading in the right direction. After the water cleared of birds, I had no idea where the drake had disappeared. Rather than search, I opted to head back to the blind. Didn’t want to ruin everybody’s hunt.

After my first screw-up, I proceeded to miss the next eight shots at teal. They were humming, but the problem was me, I knew I was aiming and that never works.

Finally I got my sighting figured out and knocked down a teal. Lola made the retrieve.

From that point on, my shooting was better. I passed on a boat-load of teal while trying to get a good shot at pintail. Finally I dropped a drake sprig dead and Lola made the retrieve.

Next I knocked down a green-wing that was a swimmer. I turned Lola loose. She was within inches of the bird, but could not catch up with it. After she turned the corner into some tules, I followed but lost sight of the action. Last year she would have retrieved this bird, but I wasn’t sure where it went and I didn’t want to stay out of the blind, so I called her off and she reluctantly returned to the blind with me, birdless. The fact that she was willing to give up was a sign of her age.

As the morning wore on it was mindful of other Kerry Club openers that went down in a similar way. There was the debate about whether to shoot pintail first or last. There was the amazing difficulty of hitting shot-at teal that never slowed down. There was the worry of shooting a spoony by mistake.

I got my second sprig, my sixth bird. It was getting late as we began the wait for a seventh bird. As sun rose higher, Lola was finished and so was I.

We closed out one shy of a limit. As we neared camp, Bob Smallman drove his ATV out to give us a lift. It was hot and the ride was appreciated.

IMG_6302 sunrise complete

The sunrise was complete as I chased after Lola and a swimmer teal that we never found.

IMG_6307 first pintail of '18 cropped

Lola with a drake pintail.

Opening day hunts are a small portion of a duck season. Unlike most other duck hunt  days, they are generally predictable. The emotions, the ducks and the shooting.

 

 

Gobbler Flock

After finishing my hike this morning, I pulled out of the parking lot and ran smack into a large flock of turkey’s. I pulled my binoculars out and examined the group. They were all gobblers and many of them were very old with long beards.

I had only my cell phone for picture taking so I did the best I could. Most of them are in this photo.

Gobbler flock cropped

I counted at least 24 gobblers in this flock.

Ranch Road Oct 6, 2018

In no particular order. Yesterday’s photos.