Archery Pig Hunt

Had a chance to hunt pigs for a day so I hopped into my truck and buzzed down I-5 to Highway 41 and turned west to Jack’s Ranch Cafe. That’s where I met up with my guide for the day.

The temperature was perfect, hovering around 101 degrees all afternoon while I shot my bow and prepared to spend the night on the mountain hoping to have a dumb pig walk up to me in the morning.

 

 

Sure enough, as I stood next to my pickup truck and waited for enough light to see, four pigs appeared in the cut barley to the north of me. But they were not dumb. They fed around a bit, about 200 yards away and didn’t stick around long. Once it was light enough to see they lined out and headed for safer territory.

By 8:00 AM with the temperature heading back towards 100, I departed for home. This was the shortest pig hunt ever. Did see about 25 pigs, but they were all leaving.

The photos show the landscape along with few pigs I drove past on the side of the road, a green gopher snake (bull snake) and a (killed by others) boar that was hanging in camp on the way out.

It was a bit of an adventure seeing country I’d not seen before and sleeping in the back of my truck on top of the mountain.

Symbiosis

While in South Africa, Linda and I observed oxpeckers eating ticks off the back of and also from inside the ear of a rhino. That is a form of symbiosis.

On occasions I’ve seen magpies and starlings feed off the back or heads of deer and cattle. Yesterday I came upon two starlings each standing on the head of a cow.

Here is a photo of the two cows, each with a starling on their head. It’s difficult to see the starling on the head of the all-black cow, but look close, you’ll see it. The beak stands out.

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Not sure if they were after flies or ticks, but there were plenty of flies. When a symbiotic relationship benefits both parties, it is called mutualism. Had to look that up.

 

 

Shady Jakes

Caught these young tom turkeys resting in the shade of a blue oak alongside the road.

Shady Jakes DSC_0964[1]

In summer, young male turkeys band together with other males their age. Gobblers tend to avoid the yearlings, but sometimes the jakes hang out near the older birds or follow them around.

After taking this photo, I stepped on the gas a little too hard and my tires spun, causing the flock to sound off together proving that turkeys do gobble in summer.