Salmon Try

Thought Monday might be a good day to catch a salmon, so my friend, Captain Bob, and I headed to the south buoy to see what we could find.

Nobody there so we asked on the radio where everybody was. The response was “head south on 210 and you’ll find the fishermen.”

We did and we did, but we couldn’t catch a fish – not even a hit-and-run.

However I did snap a few photos of some of the whales that we circling us most of the day. That’s all I’ve got.

There were quite a few birds around as well. This gull was a pretty boy.

gull DSC_0879[1]

We also noticed that the area we fished was loaded with sea-birds eating something on the surface of the water. Maybe krill (small fish) – possibly the same thing the whales were after.

The trip back got a bit rough, which made things a bit more interesting. All and all it was a good day. From the reports we got, our experience was consistent with the norm, but a few nice salmon were caught.

 

Sturgeon Success

After three tries this spring, I finally hooked onto a nice sturgeon. My fishing buddy Bob, who has already landed a couple slot fish, took this video. The fish is obviously large and prehistoric looking. Even if we could have taken him home, I don’t think we would have got him into the boat. Just not properly prepared.

Later on Bob hooked a sturgeon that was just about a carbon copy of mine.

It was a good day. We also brought home a couple keeper stripers.

Pilot Peak Lahontan Cutthroat Trout

Rich 15, Rob 16, 3-25-17

The story of these Pyramid Lake trout is interesting.

Two stains of Lahontan cutthroat trout inhabit the lake. The most recent reintroduction of trout to Pyramid Lake came from a strain of fish found near Pilot Peak in the Pilot Peak Mountains which are located along the eastern border of Nevada, very close to Idaho.

These trout carry the same DNA as the nearly extinct migratory trout that once spawned in the Truckee River from Pyramid Lake to Lake Tahoe. After DNA analysis, trout from the Pilot Peak Mountains were transplanted into Pyramid Lake where they have thrived and grown at rapid rates into monster fish like the two pictured above. These fish were 15 and16 pounds.

For more information, search for Pilot Peak strain, Lahontan cutthroat, Pyramid Lake. It is an amazing story.

Return to Pyramid Lake

In the late 1970’s my brother Rob and I fished Pyramid Lake. We camped on the beach and fished wooly worms with a slow strip along the bottom. We didn’t have the traditional ladders used by shore fishermen to rise above the water’s surface to stay warm.

The lake was known for big cut-throat trout and we caught some. Rob fished Pyramid again a year or two later, and caught a nine-pound cut-throat.

To this day it is probably the largest trout either of us has caught while fly fishing, although Rob has caught a couple of others in that same size range. My largest life-time trout (until this past weekend) caught fly fishing or otherwise was an eight-pound brown.

Our idea of “big” in the fly-fishing-for-trout category were completely changed on Friday on our return trip to Pyramid Lake.

On this trip we stayed in a comfortable room at the Nugget Casino as we joined other members of the Tri-Valley Fly Fishers Club guided by Rob Anderson of PyramidLakeFlyFishing.com.

We had it easy as Rob brought the ladders, flies and food. He also repaired our tangles and netted our fish.

We fished with midge larvae imitations and strike indicators. Our flies were set at a depth to keep them just off the bottom.

The largest fish of the trip was brother Rob’s 17 pounder.

There were several high-lights during the trip. We didn’t think Saturday could out-due Friday as the Friday windy weather produced many fish including 16 and 17 pounders.

Unfortunately I came away without a photo of Rob’s big one, so I’ve posted his second largest fish of the day (nine pounds) and my largest fish of the trip a 16 pounder.

We coasted into Saturday needing to catch no fish or to prove anything. Ironically, Saturday’s mostly sunny weather didn’t slow the fishing down, especially for Rob who landed 17 fish. And, four of them weighed eight pounds or more.

The surprise was when we hooked two great fish at the same time. The ensuing battle included reel-pealing runs, crossed lines and Rob’s line spool falling from his reel.

He managed to keep it together while I struggled to keep my fish out of the way and others dip-netted to retrieve his spool from three feet of water while Rob played the fish by hand.

Finally Rob Anderson netted my fish, which turned out to be 15 pounds. A few minutes later a helpful bystander netted Rob’s, which was 16.

Another fisherman, Chris Hallmark, landed a third fish at almost the same time and it weighed 18 pounds.

Here’s Rob Anderson’s photo of the result. (left to right, Chris Hallmark, myself, Rob Anderson and Rob Fletcher)

The Triple Lindy

You can hardly imagine how difficult it was to lift those three slippery monsters into the air at the same time. All of the fish were released in good shape as were all the fish we caught over the two days of fishing.

For information about tying the midge flies and guided fishing trips, go to Rob Anderson’s web page at PyramidLakeFlyFishing.com.

Tarpon Video

On day four of our trip to Xcalak, our guide, Alberto, suggested that we give tarpon a try. After an exciting boat ride along the reef, we entered an area surrounded by mangroves. While listening to chachalacas (partridge) calling and tarpon splashing, we watched crocodiles swim along the mangroves at the far end of the lagoon. The setting was perfect.

Here’s the video I took as Rob cast to active tarpon.

After Rob caught his, it was my turn. After several missed opportunities, I too landed a baby tarpon. We followed up with a fruitless attempt at snook, but caught a dozen or so perch and small jacks in the channel that connected the lagoon to the beach head.

Later on we made it back to the flats and added a few bonefish, snapper and jack. It was a fun day.

Fish the Fall River and Golf at The Fall River Country Club.

Your host for this two-day trip will be Rob Lawson of Lawson’s Wildlife Adventures.

Lodging will be at the Fall River Inn and all meals for the two-day stay are included.

Rob Lawson will be your guide while you fish the Fall River and/or Bidwell Reservoir. You make the choice and Rob will take care of the rest. Fishing in the Fall River will be from Rob’s 14′ Aluminum Boat while fishing at Bidwell Reservoir will be from float tubes provided by Rob.

Bring your fly rod and golf clubs to the Fall River Inn and enjoy this two-day sojourn in the Shasta Cascade Country.

Stacks Image 13

One of the fishing options is Bidwell Reservoir where you may catch a giant rainbow like the one pictured.

Green fees at Fall River Country Club are not included, but Rob will transport you to the club and pick you up when your round is complete. You can fish one day and golf the other or do all in one day.

Here are links to the MDF banquet flyer.

Flyer front page

2014 flyer pg 2

2014 ticket order form