Monday on the Bay

Got an early start fishing out of Berkley. Picked up bait in SF and ran back past Treasure Island to the Alameda Rock Wall.

Hooked up on quite a few shakers, which reduced our boredom. Then we caught two keeper stripers.

IMG_4843 undersize halibut ARW 4-9-18

Almost legal, but not quite. I posed for a picture anyway. Captain Bob laughed at me.

Looked like the highlight of the day might be the baseball we netted about mid day.

Unfortunately it was a little league model and not one that came the way of AT&T Park.

Then we boated a halibut over the minimum. It was almost a day worthy of remembering.

About 2:00 PM, we decided to shift from the Alameda Rock Wall over to the Berkley flats. On our way we passed a party boat.

“California Dawn,” said Captain Bob. “They’ve been doing well in this area lately.”

Time to pull over and give it a try. Ten minutes later my rod dipped and my reel began to  pay out line.

“This is a real fish,” I said, as a maneuvered my rod over the engine to face the fish.

We soon had a couple good looks at it and we knew it was special. I let it play out a ways from the boat, not wanting it to get close until it was worn down a bit.

When it was time to net the fish, Captain Bob was ready and did a great job of making sure we didn’t have one of those “at-the-boat” events.

The fish was 38.5 inches long and weighed in at 20 pounds. Long and not fat, but a great fish. Suddenly the fishing had gone from good to great.

Had our best success at the end of the low slack tide.

IMG_4846 38 in striper ARW 4-9-18

Biggest striper I’ve caught. And, I’ve logged in a lot of hours fishing for them.

Now he’s shrink-wrapped.

 

 

 

Fish-out 2018

This was the weekend of the annual fish-out, an event created and fostered by my brother, Rob. Despite significant rain, the event went off without a hitch and we had a great time.

The libations were liberal and masculinity was evident.

IMG_2931 Fryd's striper 2018

Nice striper.

When I departed yesterday, the largest fish honor was held by John Frydendahl – a striped bass of about 15 pounds.

John also told us that he’d been “spooled” by another fish before the rest of us arrived. We could only wonder about the size of that one.

The white-front geese appeared to be staging for a flight north. They will leave any time now.

Pheasants and mallards were displaying and chasing each other around. Managed to photograph one rooster in full bloom.

DSC_0327[1] rooster

 

 

 

 

Pyramid Lake 2018

On Sunday March 18th, a group of us traveled to Pyramid Lake to try our luck on Lahontan cutthroat trout. We caught a break in the weather, which was nice but maybe not conducive to the best of fishing success.

We fished Sunday afternoon, Monday all day and Tuesday until about noon. The results were scant. Four of us caught eleven trout, six of them on Monday.

Brother Rob did the best, catching seven over the span. The rest of us caught four. It was a bit laborious considering the result. The largest was about five or six pounds.

Photos were taken with Rob’s Iphone.

 

Fish Finding

 

Fish finding is not necessarily the same as fish catching.

The fish finder can be a bit frustrating. Captain Bob has been making some changes to our tweeting fish finder and it has been helpful. Yesterday our fish finder “runnethed  over”, but the fish did not follow.

Here are a couple views of our fish finder yesterday morning.

First we tried the entrance buoys at Half Moon Bay. Here’s what we saw.

IMG_3378 Half Moon Bay

You can see our lonely downrigger balls, but not much else when we first lowered our bait. That’s the bait hovering at about 29 feet.

Ironically, despite a lack of visuals, we managed to catch a salmon of about 7 or 8 pounds after an hour of trolling. Then word came in that fish were stacked up at the Pacifica Pier – about 15 miles north.

We were on the move and when we arrived near the Pacifica Pier, here’s what we saw.

IMG_3415 Pacifica

The “low chirp” (lower frequency) view, on the right, is outrageous. This is the most stuff I’ve ever seen on our fish finder. The upside down Vs are fish. The other stuff is bait fish. The wiggly lines through the midde is our bait.

Once again you ran see the path of our two downrigger balls and single lead ball. You would think that we would have had a triple hook-up. Amazingly, after about 3 hours fishing near the Pier, we had caught only one fish –  a shaker about 15 inches long. And, we had a couple other fish on for a moment.

About 1:00 PM we departed back towards the Half Moon Bay dock. Near the entrance buoy we trolled again, until about 2:30. Not much going on and no fish.

We arrived at the dock to learn that at about 2:00 PM, the fishing at the Pacifica Pier went wide open with many people catching limits in a hurry.

Not only do you need to find’em. You need to find’em when they’re hungry.

That’s fishing.

 

 

Salmon Success at Last

Captain Bob and I made our first salmon attempt out of Half Moon Bay in April. Then we tried Monterrey Bay and out the gate to the South buoy. After three trips we were still stuck on zero. The closest we came to paydirt was a boat-side miss on the Monterrey trip.

Monday we finally turned it around. Three of us landed four of the seven fish we hooked and I was fortunate enough to land a 20 pound plus king that made me proud. Captain Bob and  his guest Paul landed the other three which were all between six and ten pounds.

We caught the fish on a trip to the north, almost to Point Reyes and within a few miles of the Farallon Islands. Here’s a photo of my fish. You can see Point Reyes in the background. We used anchovies trolled with a triangle flasher.

IMG_3364 Rich 22#

We had a great day with good salmon action,  light seas and many interesting critters – whales, porpoise and seals – around to keep us entertained.

According to reports we gathered, the fishing was generally about a fish per rod, with one notable exception, a ferry boat that fished away from the pack and caught limits around.

Salmon Try

Thought Monday might be a good day to catch a salmon, so my friend, Captain Bob, and I headed to the south buoy to see what we could find.

Nobody there so we asked on the radio where everybody was. The response was “head south on 210 and you’ll find the fishermen.”

We did and we did, but we couldn’t catch a fish – not even a hit-and-run.

However I did snap a few photos of some of the whales that we circling us most of the day. That’s all I’ve got.

There were quite a few birds around as well. This gull was a pretty boy.

gull DSC_0879[1]

We also noticed that the area we fished was loaded with sea-birds eating something on the surface of the water. Maybe krill (small fish) – possibly the same thing the whales were after.

The trip back got a bit rough, which made things a bit more interesting. All and all it was a good day. From the reports we got, our experience was consistent with the norm, but a few nice salmon were caught.

 

Sturgeon Success

After three tries this spring, I finally hooked onto a nice sturgeon. My fishing buddy Bob, who has already landed a couple slot fish, took this video. The fish is obviously large and prehistoric looking. Even if we could have taken him home, I don’t think we would have got him into the boat. Just not properly prepared.

Later on Bob hooked a sturgeon that was just about a carbon copy of mine.

It was a good day. We also brought home a couple keeper stripers.