More on Fishing Southeast Alaska

 

 

 

 

Fishing Southeast Alaska

Our week with Wild Alaska Cruises was spent along the southern edge of islands known as the ABC Islands of Alaska. There are many other groups of islands in the world’s oceans with the same name.

The three islands that make up the AK-ABC group are Admiralty Island, Baranof Island and Chicagof Island. Our fishing took place south of Admiralty and west of Baranof Island to the east of Petersburg where our flight landed.

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The mother ship, the Perseverance, is specifically designed as a luxury private yacht. It is 90 feet long, carries a crew of six and eight passengers. Two skiffs ride atop the fantail and two guide boats are towed behind. Every detail has been carefully thought out by the owner, Larry Larson.

Our trip on the Perseverance was slow and steady. It traveled at about seven knots. Most of the time, the two guide boats either led or followed the mother ship to our destination, as they could travel at greater speed. That gave us time to fish along the way. Stratham Straight is a large body of water with heavy ocean influence. There we found halibut, salmon, lingcod and rock fish.

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Here’s a picture of the Patience’s depth finder after it passed over a school of pelagic rock fish.

Our host was Larry Larson, Captain and owner of the Perseverance. Our fishing guides were Robert Elliot and Chase Martenson. They knew how to find and catch fish. It is a very large area with plenty of voids and also nooks holding numbers of fish.

Overview of Wild Alaska Fishing  and Cruises, September 2018

Overview of Wild Alaska Fishing and Cruises, September 2018

Got home at midnight last night. No time for details. Here’s a representative photo from each day of our trip.

We flew out of San Jose on Saturday and landed in Petersburg about 3 PM. Spent the night in town and were underway on Sunday morning, September 9.

My plan is to expand on this post as I find more time. Lots of photos and lots of fish.

Halibut and rock fish were landed on Sunday afternoon.

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Mason checks out our first fish of the trip, halibut.

On day two, we landed limits of coho salmon and saw our first brown bear.

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First brown bear of the trip, day two.

Day three produced salmon limits again and perfect weather in the cove where Perseverance was anchored.

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The cove was quite calm when cousin, Wes, and I approached Perseverance, with coho limits, mid-morning, on day 3.

We had a lot of fishing action on day four.

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Robin hooked big halibut on day 4.

Day five produced more fishing success and some variety.

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Chase holds Cathy’s huge lingcod on day 5.

Day six was our last chance to catch salmon.

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Wes with his day 6 coho (silver) salmon.

On day seven, I found this dog sleeping on an island in the bay, a prelude to some fishing excitement.

More to come.

Will Robin land the halibut?

Stand by.

Fishing the Copper River

We were on the Copper River for five days with Jack Johnson of the Alaska Legends Lodge. The sockeyes arrived two days before we did. There were plenty of them. The trout were scarce. We spent some time trying to catch them too, but the big ones mostly broke off.

For the most part we cast pink and green sockeye flies at the fish with six to eight weight rods and ten to twelve pound leaders. The sockeyes were very fresh and very strong. They fought like crazy, jumping and cartwheeling. We may have caught 50% of what we hooked.

For trout we tried a lot of flies. I hooked a large rainbow with a cadis imitation dry fly, but couldn’t keep him on. A fly called the Dolly Llama hooked the most trout, but again we failed to land the largest of the bunch.

Typical size for the sockeyes was five to eight pounds, with a few outliers.

Best photo of the trip:

DSCN0137 eagle with salmon C&R

Here are some more photos. More to follow.

Heading to the Copper River

Me and five buddies will be landing at Lake Iliamna on Friday. Were going to spend five days with Jack Johnson at the Alaska Legends Lodge. Purchased the trip as a group almost two years ago.

The plan is to catch a bunch of sockeye salmon and also some of the huge rainbows that follow the salmon up stream during July.

All fly fishing. My bags are packed. I’ll probably unpack and pack them again later today.

Hopefully I’ll have some great pictures upon return. Here’s my draft check list.

Alaska fishing 2018

Fish Finding

 

Fish finding is not necessarily the same as fish catching.

The fish finder can be a bit frustrating. Captain Bob has been making some changes to our tweeting fish finder and it has been helpful. Yesterday our fish finder “runnethed  over”, but the fish did not follow.

Here are a couple views of our fish finder yesterday morning.

First we tried the entrance buoys at Half Moon Bay. Here’s what we saw.

IMG_3378 Half Moon Bay

You can see our lonely downrigger balls, but not much else when we first lowered our bait. That’s the bait hovering at about 29 feet.

Ironically, despite a lack of visuals, we managed to catch a salmon of about 7 or 8 pounds after an hour of trolling. Then word came in that fish were stacked up at the Pacifica Pier – about 15 miles north.

We were on the move and when we arrived near the Pacifica Pier, here’s what we saw.

IMG_3415 Pacifica

The “low chirp” (lower frequency) view, on the right, is outrageous. This is the most stuff I’ve ever seen on our fish finder. The upside down Vs are fish. The other stuff is bait fish. The wiggly lines through the midde is our bait.

Once again you ran see the path of our two downrigger balls and single lead ball. You would think that we would have had a triple hook-up. Amazingly, after about 3 hours fishing near the Pier, we had caught only one fish –  a shaker about 15 inches long. And, we had a couple other fish on for a moment.

About 1:00 PM we departed back towards the Half Moon Bay dock. Near the entrance buoy we trolled again, until about 2:30. Not much going on and no fish.

We arrived at the dock to learn that at about 2:00 PM, the fishing at the Pacifica Pier went wide open with many people catching limits in a hurry.

Not only do you need to find’em. You need to find’em when they’re hungry.

That’s fishing.

 

 

Salmon Success at Last

Captain Bob and I made our first salmon attempt out of Half Moon Bay in April. Then we tried Monterrey Bay and out the gate to the South buoy. After three trips we were still stuck on zero. The closest we came to paydirt was a boat-side miss on the Monterrey trip.

Monday we finally turned it around. Three of us landed four of the seven fish we hooked and I was fortunate enough to land a 20 pound plus king that made me proud. Captain Bob and  his guest Paul landed the other three which were all between six and ten pounds.

We caught the fish on a trip to the north, almost to Point Reyes and within a few miles of the Farallon Islands. Here’s a photo of my fish. You can see Point Reyes in the background. We used anchovies trolled with a triangle flasher.

IMG_3364 Rich 22#

We had a great day with good salmon action,  light seas and many interesting critters – whales, porpoise and seals – around to keep us entertained.

According to reports we gathered, the fishing was generally about a fish per rod, with one notable exception, a ferry boat that fished away from the pack and caught limits around.