Bob’s DU Duck Barbecue

My good friend and hunting partner, Bob Smallman taught me a new angle on barbecued duck. He call’s it DU teal as he claims he learned it from a recipe created by Duck Unlimited. However, it is so basic that probably many people have recreated it over time.

Here’s how it goes: Shoot a teal (or other duck) and have your dog retrieve it.

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Admire the bird, take a photo and treat it with respect.

Brett with mixed blind from blind f, 1-19-19

Pluck the bird (s) with care, removing as many pin feathers as possible. Remove head, wings and feet. Then slice down the breastbone and filet each side of the bird, keeping only the breast and leg on each side.

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The good news is you don’t have to get messy. The intestines stay inside the bird.

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What you have now is almost 100% meat.  Season with your favorites.

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These are my go-to seasonings. Heat the (gas) barbecue to 400 degrees. Marinate the filets in vinegar, oil and seasonings. Flop them onto the red-hot grill for 2 or 3 minutes. They will flame up nicely. Flip them over for 1 or 2 minutes depending upon how well done you want them. Be careful. They cook very quickly.

Remove them from the grill. They should look something like this.

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Can’t beat this. You will not find any pinfeathers as any that were there are now burned off. I’m hungrey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Devil’s Garden (M9) (A27) Hunters

Having hunted the M9 hunt twice, I have a general feel for this hunt. I’ve not killed a buck on the M9 trips, but I’ve seen and photographed a bunch of deer. Maybe I  should have shot at one or two of them, but I chose not to.

Here’s an update for 2019. Looks like the weather is going to be warm and clear during at least the first half of the season, which closes on November 10. It appears to me that the deer leave the northeastern portion of the X2 zone about this time of the year. However, it is unclear to me if the larger bucks wait and migrate as the heavier winter storms hit.

I’ve not found the largest X2 bucks in the areas with the most does on my two hunts. I know there are larger bucks because I’ve seen them during summer trips to the area northeast of Crowder Flat.

During the 2017 early archery season, I saw numerous bucks larger that I’ve found during the M9 hunt. And, the general rifle hunt pressures those big bucks so they stick to heavy cover.

Therefore, I’d suggest that a trophy hunter (I mean looking for something like a 26+ inch buck with all the goodies), should hunt the area inside the M9 boundary just west of Crowder Flat to intercept the largest bucks if and when they move. That’s just a suggestion and I wouldn’t spend my entire hunt working that angle.

IMG_3106 2016 Doyle buck

This 2016 M3 buck is by far my biggest California buck. I’d call a buck like him a genuine shooter buck. But, some people would pass him up. He’s 28 inches wide and 18 inches tall.

If you’re willing to go home empty handed because you didn’t find that trophy, I’d not hunt where the does are because that’s where most of the hunters will be. There’s plenty of habitat in the northern half of the M9 zone where the big bucks can stay safe and if you hunt them you won’t be seeing a lot of deer, but you may find a loner buck that fulfills your dream.

If you’re not a trophy hunter or you’ve never killed a 4×4 mule deer, but you’d like to be successful on a nice buck (something like a 20-22 inch 4×4), I’d hunt the area with the most does. That would be the southern end of the M9 zone in timbered areas between Mowitz Road and Deer Hill. And, that doesn’t mean you can’t kill a monster in that area.

That southern area is where I’ve seen the largest concentration of deer, including many medium sized bucks. Here are some of them:

Just my opinion, but it is based upon experience

Round Valley – Returning to a Place I’ve Never Been Before

How do you return to a place where you’ve never been?

No. If you’ve never been there, you can’t return. But you can go to a place which you’ve interacted with many times over a long period of time. It’s possible to feel like you’ve been there even though you haven’t even been close.

That’s the way it is with me and Round Valley, located just a few miles west of Bishop, California. That’s south of Crowley Reservoir and in the northwest corner of the Owen’s Valley.

Here’s a link to a map of the hunting area:  https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=83619&inline

The reason I feel like I’ve been there is  based upon my activities of more than 20 years ago while I was editor of the Mule Deer Foundation magazine, Mule Deer – more recently known as MDF Magazine.

We published an article about deer management in Round Valley and another about monitoring mountain lions. The author of those stories was Becky Pierce who still works for California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

So, now, for the first time ever I’m going to Round Valley. The next step will be figuring out the best way to hunt. Looks like the weather is going to be pretty mild between now and November 10th, which means it may be hard to locate the biggest bucks. But I’ll be trying.

I’ve been doing some research and it looks like my best chance will be to catch a buck heading south out of the Mammoth Lakes area. The deer tend to come out of the west and follow the edge of the mountains down towards Bishop.

We’ll find out soon if they’re going to cooperate and if I’m going to find the right one.

Decoy Day

Many hands make light work. That is no better demonstrated than on decoy day at the Kerry Club, which is located in the North Grasslands adjacent to the Volta State Wildlife Area. With about 20 blinds that need decoys, it is necessary for the members to contribute a day of their time to paint, replace line on about 2500 decoys, kill the black widows, clean the inside of the blinds, add new “brush” to the outside, remove peeling paint, add a coat of new paint and grease the stems on the rotating stools.

Decoy day is also the day when members participate in a random draw for their place in the blind rotation. The rotation assures that each member gets a fair share of the best blinds. On good days all the blinds shoot well, but on slow days a good blind pays off as there are a few blinds that almost always shoot well.

On opening day members shoot at the blind they decoy, after that the rotation is in effect.

Each blind has a traditional pattern for decoy placement based upon location in the blind relative to the prevailing winds and also relative to its position in the pond.

Our blind is located on the southeast corner of a large pond. Because the prevailing winds are out of the northwest, we need to have about half our decoys on the southeast side of the blind to attempt to get the birds to swing around the blind and come back in from the southeast. On days when the wind blows out of the south, the blind usually shoots best, but on opening day their are usually enough ducks no matter where the wind comes from.

Decoy lines must be 1/8 of an inch in diameter and of the proper material. The weights must be at least eight ounces to assure the decoys do not float away (in powerful storms, some do anyway).

Tom and I choose to keep the ducks in groups of like species. About half of our decoys are teal, maybe a third are pintails and the rest are a mix.

We have one shoveler decoy that floated in from another blind and a half-dozen mallard.

You can see from the photos that the Kerry Club is managed for wide-open water. The bag is mostly teal, with pintail, shovelers and a few divers mixed in.

August Coming to a Close

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Spent last week at Lake Almanor. The fishing was rough, but there was some promise.

My friend Bob Smallman and I searched for fish at Almanor without success. We did find some fish on our fishfinder, but only one hit during the entire effort and we didn’t hook him.

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Here’s Rob with the new boat at it sat behind the Bass Pro store in San Jose.

I’ve recently invested in a pair of downriggers, so now I need to learn how to operate them. Looks like YouTube time. Linda and I cruised the lake in our new boat – quite fun, but it is definitely a lot of work managing it and getting it ready for action.

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Linda enjoyed the comfort of the boat which can seat eight people.

While at Almanor, Rob was in Alaska fishing for Coho salmon. I’m sure he’ll have some photos that he’ll share.

My neighbor at Almanor drew a X6A archery deer tag and came home with a whopper.

Tomorrow I’m meeting with my doctor and I hope I’ll come home with a good  understanding of what to expect with my ankle as it continues to heal. Right now I’m walking fine, but not setting any land speed records. His input will help me plan my deer hunting. The Open-Zone tag will play a big role in my hunt as the extra weeks before the seasons close should allow me to hunt in a near-normal fashion.

If all goes as planned, on Tuesday we’ll be heading back to Almanor. I know where some fish live. Now I need to find out how to get to them.

In the meantime I spent a couple hours today messing with decoys as duck season is approaching. Here are a few of the birds in the project.

Yesterday I cleaned out the freezer and smoked the salmon remaining from last season.

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These were Silvers from last September’s trip to AK. Still in very good shape.

That’s about it for August, unless I get into some fish this week. Most of the Labor Day Weekend will be occupied by watching the grandkids as they explore the outdoors around the lake.

Nice to be on my feet again.

Overwhelmed by Opportunity

Overwhelmed. That’s what I am. Overwhelmed by hunting opportunity.

A good friend invited me to hunt with him on his ranch in the B1 Zone during the late season blacktail hunt November 9-24. My Open Zone tag allows me to hunt that unit, so I can’t say no to that. I’d love to kill a 4×4 blacktail. Maybe this will be the year.

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My biggest blacktail. Yes this guy was entered in the local Native Sons of the Golden West Buck Contest ( BBC). You can see that I never removed the entry band. He finished a distant seventh or something like that, but he is still the largest blacktail buck I’ve ever seen while hunting the A Zone. 

The notice for the Livermore Native Sons Big Buck Contest arrived in the mail last week. Pricing system has changed. With an Open Zone tag I need to pay a $35 entry fee for each Zone I want to be entered in. Well we know I’ll enter in A and B1, that’s already decided.

Of course I have to hunt in X2, it’s my favorite unit. The Devil’s Garden has many opportunities to kill a buck, there’s archery in August – the bucks will be in the timber of the northeastern portion of the unit. I killed a buck there in August of 2017. It was a small 4×4 and the hunt was possibly the most exciting hunt of my life. I’m sure I posted the story.

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This is my 2017 Zone X-2 archery buck. Got drawn with four preference points. My largest Archery buck finished in second place in the “All California” category. 

Here are some shots showing deer and other wildlife that are prevalent in the Garden.

 

And, I must be prepared to hunt in Zone X-6B. X-6B holds some of the states largest mule deer bucks. And, it’s so close to Reno that I might be able to once again spend a few nights with my buddy Jerry and commute to Doyle. The muzzleloader hunt centered around Doyle takes place during the rut. That hunt will surely cost me a $35 entry fee. It’s a bargain.

A place I haven’t hunted is X-6A, but I’m planning to hunt that unit this year because it’s only a 40 minute drive from our family vacation home at Lake Almanor. I know there are some big bucks there and the area east of Susanville called Bass Hill has some of the worlds most massive growth of bitter brush. It would be a mistake not to enter into X-6A. I’d hate to bag a dandy and have it sit on the side lines.

I’m motivated to attempt to add a nice California mule deer to my modest collection of mule deer mounts. The best opportunity to do that is probably Zone D-6. I can hunt there during the rut and if the snow flies early, bucks will migrate out of Yosemite.  D-6? Another $35. What the heck. Can’t enter the game without covering all the bases. Last season a friend of mine killed an awesome buck in that unit.

It would be nice to bag one of each of the subspecies of mule deer in California. So far I have killed a California mule deer, Inyo mule deer, Rocky Mountain mule deer and Columbian Blacktail. There are three others, the desert mule deer, the burro mule deer and the southern mule deer, but the fact that they’re way down south means I’ll probably never to after any of those guys.

The Round Valley hunt in Zone X-9A has been on my list for a long time, but unless something changes, I’ll once again not make it there for the hunt. The silver lining is that I’ll save $35 and a long drive to the Eastern Sierras.

Sent a check for $175.  It goes to a good cause and we have a very active Livermore Chapter with some very dedicated volunteers and participating members