William Cashmore, Gunmaker 1819-1877

As a result of a September 27, 2012 post about the William Cashmore double barrel shotgun I purchased in 1972, I received a very helpful email about William Cashmore, the gun maker. I’ve decided to copy it here so as not to change any of the information provided by William Cashmore’s great, great granddaughter. This is a testament to the power of the internet.
 Hi Rich,
I was browsing on the web using the words “Cashmore guns” because I am researching our family tree and William Cashmore was my great great grandfather.  I read your blog and it was so good to see the pictures.  
 
I have assembled quite a bit of information about this company, and have recently purchased a reproduced document called a Trade Label from a company in England called Peter Dyson, as a birthday present for my Aunt, who is William’s great granddaughter – I thought you might be interested in this – they sell them quite cheaply, although I guess postage to the USA would add to the price.        https://www.peterdyson.co.uk         -& search for Cashmore
 
William, the gunmaker, (the son of William, a maltster and master brewer!) was born in 1819 in Birmingham, Warwickshire, and married Sarah Bland, daughter of Edwin Bland, gun finisher.  Sarah’s brother Thomas Bland was also a gunmaker, and the two families/companies collaborated on several developments.  There were also engravers in both the Cashmore and Bland families.

In the 1851 census William and Sarah were recorded living in Newton Street, with 2 daughters, Julia & Elizabeth.  In the 1861 census they lived in Steelhouse Lane, and had added 4 sons, William (b.1853), Thomas James (b.1857), Albert (b.1859) and Frank (b.1860). William described himself as a gun and pistol maker. The 1871 census records William living at Holte House, Aston Village, (now under the Aston Villa football ground) with Sarah, Julia, William, Thomas, Albert and Frank.   On 9 December 1887 F (Frank ?) Cashmore and T Bland patented a rotating block striker mechanism for four barrelled guns (No. 16969).
 
William died in 1877.  The 1891 census records Sarah living as a widow at 261 Hoagley Road, Edgbaston, with Albert (a gun maker, my great grandfather) and Frank (aged 27 living on own means) and a grandson, Frank Edwards (b.1881).
 
On 11 October 1894 S Mills patented a locking mechanism which used downward hinging external arms to operate internal locking lumps on either side of the action (No. 19300). This patent was used by William Cashmore who on 12 September 1895 patented an improvement to it (No. 17040). On 20 December 1895 William Cashmore patented a single selective trigger mechanism in which the trigger was in either a left or right position (No. 24426). On 7 March 1896 F Cashmore, C O Ellis and E W Wilkinson patented an extractor and ejection mechanism for revolvers (No. 5151). On 18 November 1896 W Cashmore and G Brazier patented a safety catch(No. 25944).  On 9 December 1887 F (Frank ?) Cashmore and T Bland patented a rotating block striker mechanism for four barrelled guns (No. 16969).

The company made some guns for Annie Oakley, one of which is I believe in the Cody Firearms Museum in Wyoming.
Albert, my great grandfather, visited Australia on behalf of the company and the newspaper article about this can be seen on Trove (the Australian newspaper archive website) :-
 
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/120341121?searchTerm=Mr Cashmore recently arrived&searchLimits=l-title=499
 
Sorry if this is too much information!
 
I live in England, in West Devon.  Don’t worry, I won’t bombard you with any more of this stuff, but if you have any questions, please get in touch.
 
Best regards
 
Mary Baldwin
Before posting her email, I checked in with Mary and she asked me to note that some of the information she provided is best guess and not verified. She also gleaned the information from sources like birth and marriage certificates, Ancestry.com and census documents.

Wrong Side of the Fence

This young buck was observed along a deer-proof fence, but on the vineyard side.

I photographed this buck walking along a deer-proof fence, but on the vineyard side.

How does a deer get trapped on the wrong side of a vineyards fence?  And, what happens to that deer when it can’t get out.

A large gate along Arroyo Road in Livermore, at Wente Vineyards near the VA hospital is usually shut when I drive by, but apparently this buck managed to sneak through and become trapped inside the fence which is supposed to keep deer away from the grapes and the Golf Course.

Might be nice if they would install a one-way escape gate. There is such a thing.

There are many versions. Here’s one.

Ruby Mountains Muzzleloader Hunt 2014

We had the mountains to ourselves and they were great. The mules produced the best trail riding of my pack-in career. The company was superb. My new EL10X42 Swarovski Optik field glasses were all they were supposed to be.

However, the mule deer bucks did not cooperate. I saw three legal bucks in six days of hunting. After the first three days produced poor results by the traditional spot and stalk method, we switched to still hunting, which is my favorite way to hunt.

However, the results were the same. Came within 20 yards of one buck and we suspected he was there, but he busted loose and disappeared in a flash. He was gone so fast that I couldn’t have touched him with bird shot in my Beretta O/U 12 guage.

Got some nice photos, but no venison.

Much of the time I had two guides. Dan Riddle and outfitter Henry Krenka.

Much of the time I had two guides. Dan Riddle and outfitter Henry Krenka.

On day three, Henry spotted this goat a long way off, but he didn't escape my Nikon.

On day three, Henry spotted this goat a long way off, but he didn’t escape my Nikon.

Center left in this photo is a nearly flat rock from which we glassed for deer on day one. As the trip progresses, the aspen began turning yellow and the service berry  red.

Center left in this photo is a nearly flat rock from which we glassed for deer on day one. As the trip progresses, the aspen began turning yellow and the service berry red.

Henry and Dan accomodated me well. Here they are bringing me my horse. Camp is in the background.

Henry and Dan accomodated me well. Here they are bringing me my horse. Camp is in the background.

Henry's comfortable camp was tucked away in an aspen patch at about 8,500 feet above sea level.

Henry’s comfortable camp was tucked away in an aspen patch at about 8,500 feet above sea level.

The mountain tops were impressive and reminded me of other rock faces I've seen above 10,000 feet.

The mountain tops were impressive and reminded me of other rock faces I’ve seen above 10,000 feet.

Despite some serious hiking and mule riding, I gained three pounds on the trip which is indicative of the quality and quantity of food provided.

Despite some serious hiking and mule riding, I gained three pounds on the trip which is indicative of the quality and quantity of food provided.

I sincerely could not have had a better time, even if I’d killed a big buck. Next time I draw a Nevada muzzleloader tag, I won’t hunt until after the 20th of September. The weather and moon phase are better later in the month and I’m convinced that it had a lot to do with our inability to locate bucks, which didn’t show themselves during the day.

Western White-tailed Deer

On a recent road trip to Oregon and Idaho, I came upon white-tailed deer in both states.

In Oregon, west of Portland, Columbia white-tailed deer were present on a duck club I was viewing. Managed to photograph several, but the conditions were not great for photography. Here is a picture of a whitetail doe.

One of many Columbia whitetails that came out to feed in the fields.

The Columbia white-tailed deer is a threatened species and is protected in northern Oregon. No hunting is allowed, but in southern Oregon, there is limited opportunity to hunt them.

On Monday, Linda and I arrived at a friend’s home near Riggins, Idaho. While leaving on Tuesday, a few whitetails were caught out in the open. This whitetail buck stopped and posed.

This young buck stopped in the morning sun and posed for a portrait.

Two species of Western white-tailed deer, a long-weekend double.

Tiger Salamander Larvae Approach Metamorphosis

Here are some of the better photos we’ve taken of California Tiger Salamander larvae this summer.  These larvae are all showing various signs of morphing into terrestrial juvenile CTS. These photos were all taken under the supervision of biologist, Joe DiDonato, who has a state and federal permits for handling CTS.

We began to monitor CTS larvae in May. Initially, our take was larva all under 50 mm in length. Look where they are now.

This larva measured 122 mm in length. It is beginning to develop the some of the adult coloration. It's gills are 16mm, showing signs of shrinkage.

This larva measured 122 mm in length. It is beginning to develop the some of the adult coloration. It’s gills are 16mm, showing signs of recession.

This 141 mm larva is quite large. It is showing coloration changes.

This 141 mm larva is showing coloration changes.

120 mm in length

120 mm in length

 

140 mm length, 17 mm gills and coloration changes.

140 mm length, 17 mm gills and coloration changes.

105 mm long and showing signs of morphing.

105 mm long and showing signs of morphing.

123 mm in length and 166 mm gills.

123 mm in length and 16 mm gills.

124 mm in length with gills down to 3 mm, this is a metamorph that will leave the pond any day.

124 mm in length with gills down to 3 mm, this is a metamorph that will be ready to leave the pond any day.

120 mm in length with 16 mm gills, this larva also has a reduced dorsal fin.

120 mm in length with 16 mm gills, this larva also has a reduced dorsal fin.

These larvae are representative of 42 CTS larvae seined at the proposed Ohlone West Conservation bank on July 24th, 2014.  Yesterday, August 21, our crew seined 27 in similar stages of development, including another larva that was a metamorph ready to leave the pond. We believe that larvae similar to the ones shown have been leaving the pond and moving into the upland on a regular basis over the past few months. However, it is very difficult to validate exactly when they leave. We are continuing to develop ways to pin down the exact time that these larvae leave the pond and move into mammal burrows, primarily those of the California ground squirrel.

Of the five ponds in which we have recorded successful breeding at on various years, three are completely dry at this time and two still have significant water.

This has been a difficult drought year for the CTS, but we are convinced that the diversity of our ponds, including both seasonal and near perennial, has been beneficial to CTS breeding.

A-Zone Opener

We were in position. That is, my son-in-law Brett and myself were in position to shoot a buck on opening morning. We were on a rise overlooking one of our watered ponds and a three-point buck was coming towards the pond. As the buck approached, I told Brett the words he did not want to hear.

Hey Brett, I whispered, “This is a buck that we’re not going to shoot this year.”

For a moment he thought I was kidding, but I wasn’t. The buck was a young three-point buck that was not a trophy, but it was the kind of buck we wanted to keep around to see if he might become one. It wasn’t my idea, in fact it was the idea of our biologist, Joe. He suggested that by not shooting the young three point bucks, we’d probably keep them around until they became true trophies and in the meantime, they’d get a chance to add to our gene pool, which was flooded by fork-horn bucks.

A spike followed the three-point. We had both types of non-shooters in front of us.

Of course this meant that we would go the rest of the day without seeing a buck, which was the case. So, on Sunday morning we opted to head to a high point where we would be able to see more deer and that we did.

On the way, we had a nice view of the setting moon and massive fog bank that was covering the East Bay Area.

Click here to continue reading